Making a Career as a Photo Editor

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$HOLIDAY SALE $399
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January 5 – 16, 2021 (Six 2-hour sessions)

Every business you enter has multiple levels, which is what makes it so exciting to be a part of that team. You bring your specific skillset to the group and you can be a part of something great…

It’s great to be a photographer, to take wonderful images and see the various platforms they’ll live in. But there are other avenues to explore in photography without taking the actual photo. Photo Editing is one of those. It can afford you rare opportunities in a field full of wonder and visual exploration. Photographers don’t live in a vacuum. They need someone to assist with virtually everything. Photo Editors hire photographers. They convey concepts and objectives and provide logistical support. They go through hundreds even thousands of images and are responsible for finding that one. They’re also responsible for understanding which images work best for a story, and where they fit within that story. 

Being a photo editor, to me, is just as rewarding as being a photographer. We can’t live without each other, and we have to respect and appreciate each other’s talents. Let’s explore together what it takes to be an editor, how to transfer those skills into real work and possibly a career. Imagine having the opportunity to see, before anyone else, some of the best photography on the planet. And then repeating that day over and over. Let’s find out how. 

In addition to Brad’s expertise, this workshop will also have several guest speakers to add to the experience and help you be your best:

Guest lecturers coming soon!

Schedule (Six 2-hour sessions)

January 5, 2021 8pm ET: Photo Editing as a career and a skill set

January 7, 2021 8pm ET: Visual objectives / choosing the right photographer

January 9, 2021 Noon ET: The selection process

January 12, 2021 8pm ET: Metadata, archiving & workflow

January 14, 2021 8pm ET: Understanding the needs of the client

January 16, 2021 Noon ET: How to make the best editing choices